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Ron's Tips #1 Anchor Tool


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Over the next week or two I will share a few solutions I came up with for little issues I have found through the years with my boats.  These will simple and cheap to do.

电竞博彩app下载 Quite a few years ago I went out on a mates boat and he asked me to change the anchor and attach a reef pick.  The shackle was seized with rust and I couldn't undo.  Mate directed me to a set of pliers and naturally these were in same condition and rusted up.  Dug into my tackle box for pliers and soon had reef pick attached but tines were straightened from last use.  Mate had a short length of gal pipe to bend tines into shape which worked fine but it somehow didn't surprise me that this resulted in a shower of rust onto the deck from inside the pipe.

On getting home I put my thinking cap on for a solution and made the following. 

Found a couple of short lengths of heavy walled aluminium pipe left over from making a rocket launcher on my Lazeabout which were about the right size for bending tines on anchor and wouldn't have any rusting issues.  I then made a coupe of shallow cuts in one end and joined cuts with a file so I had a small slot about an eighth of an inch wide to fit the tag on end of shackle bolt as per photo.  This acts as a spanner to tighten/loosen shackles and I have also be used it on jammed bungs.  I keep this on bottom of anchor well where it is always at hand should I need to re-bend reef picks or should a shackle jam.  Mate was happy to receive one for his boat.

Hope some of you find this useful.  Ron

 

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电竞博彩app下载 Over the next week or two I will share a few solutions I came up with for little issues I have found through the years with my boats.  These will simple and cheap to do. Quite a few years ago I w

Are you suggesting that there is no record, or documented failure of a gal snap or swivel in anchoring tackle? Are you saying SS anchoring tackle is more likely to corrode than gal anchoring tack

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Hi Ron ( @campr ), necessity is the mother of invention for sure... inconvenience is another !!! 

FYI, I have done away with using shackles on anchors altogether and can change anchors even with cold wet fingers. This is my set up.

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Full write up is in this old post:

Cheers Zoran

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电竞博彩app下载 I like the idea of the stainless wire running up the back of the anchor rather than chain but i have exactly zero confidence in those clips holding should i ever desperately need them to

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19 hours ago, New Signing said:

电竞博彩app下载 I like the idea of the stainless wire running up the back of the anchor rather than chain but i have exactly zero confidence in those clips holding should i ever desperately need them to

电竞博彩app下载 I understand the concern - I had the same until I checked the load ratings -  SWL (suggested working load) is 25% of breaking strain ..

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So

Snap Hook :  1 x 290kg SWL = 290kg up to 1160kg (but there is chance of the snap coming undone)

Snap Hooks :  2 x 290kg SWL = 580kg up to 2320kg (hooks face opposite directions so almost zero chance of coming undone)

电竞博彩app下载 Quick link : 1 x 1000kg SWL = 1000 up to 4000kg

电竞博彩app下载 Rope : 8mm 1300kg BS

电竞博彩app下载 I'm feel that the bollard would probably pull out of the fglass before any of these items went....

Cheers Zoran

 

Edited by zmk1962
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New Signing has a point. Stainless steel is more brittle than mild steel. Also it can corrode in a low oxygen environment or if constantly wet and can lead to catastrophic failure even though it appears to be in acceptable condition. There is a good summary here:

 

 

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Thanks KC, I skim read the article. I didn't see it recommended one material over the other but we all know the whole marine industry recommends s/s over gal steel products for marine use.  I think the whole point of that article is to highlight that just by using s/s you cannot set and forget.

电竞博彩app下载 Anything left in saltwater is susceptible to corrosion, you still must do the periodic visual check and maintenance of the components you use.

电竞博彩app下载 I would also add that practically speaking my  s/s propeller and the s/s mounting bolts holding my outboard spend far far more time in salt water than the anchor shackles - should I be worried about catastrophic failure of these?  Not really, I am using them within their design criteria.

电竞博彩app下载 Here are some of my additional comments.

14 hours ago, kingfishbig said:

电竞博彩app下载 Stainless steel is more brittle than mild steel.

Correct. S/s has a different failure characteristic to mild steel. It is less malleable so under certain stresses it will crack before it visually deforms out of shape. A mild steel gal shackle would bend out of shape first and then snap. But if this is happening 30m underwater would you really be able to see its starting to deform and about to snap? Not really. Whether its gal steel or s/s  you would only recognise the end result - the component failed.

So for me this concern is handled by choosing a s/s component with sufficient breaking strain rating or SWL. for the job - ie used within its design limits and I'd  oversize if I was really concerned.

14 hours ago, kingfishbig said:

it can corrode in a low oxygen environment or if constantly wet and can lead to catastrophic failure even though it appears to be in acceptable condition.

Yes I am familiar with s/s corrosion and have written about it several times in different posts. S/s is an alloy of iron, chromium and various other metals. It is impossible with our manufacturing technology to uniformly disperse the various atoms to create a completely homogenous mixture so you will end up with clumps of iron atoms with a thin layer of protective chromium trioxide on top.  If scratched, these areas can pit as the iron is exposed to oxygen and rusts - we are all familiar with that annoying rust stain on our stainless products.

电竞博彩app下载 The article is somewhat confusing in mentioning that s/s  occurs in low oxygen environments - as it does not explain where then does the underlying iron atom get the oxygen to rust. If there is no oxygen for the chromium trioxide to form, where does the oxygen come from to form the iron oxide (rust) pitting underneath? I think the article just oversimplified the whole s/s corrosion phenomena.

电竞博彩app下载 From my knowledge of metallurgy, s/s corrodes in areas where it cannot form the chromium trioxide protective layer. This usually happens at a boundary / irregularity / edge where something prevents the third oxygen atom binding to the chromium atom leaving the underlying iron exposed. The edge between a plastic knife handle and the blade, the corner in a butt weld, the edges of a grease stain etc. So its not really a low oxygen environment that causes hidden s/s corrosion, its a situation where oxygen is inhibited from that particular area of the s/s surface. 

电竞博彩app下载 From a mechanical perspective, when s/s is scratched and there is oxygen in the environment it reforms the protective layer if the boundary conditions I discussed above allow it. This is unlike a gal steel product. Once the protective zinc layer is gone, there is nothing to prevent the underlying iron from completely rusting. Hence gal products have a far lower service life in a marine environment especially where there is friction movement. Look at a gal D shackle - it starts to rust at the thread and where the chain rubs - this is where the zinc is removed first. BUT the rust damage is far more visible and hence more likely that maintenance action will be taken.  Which again I think was the point of that article.

Cheers Zoran

 

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Well the article seems to come down against S/S chain and also swivels. There is more on the latter when you look at the link:

It says the swivel is an uneccessary weak point. It also points out that with most designs the shaft is hidden so you can't check for corrosion and also it is likely to collect and retain moisture.

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Thanks @kingfishbig. Another interesting read by the same author. He seems to be going against the rest of the industry on this topic. Both Stressfree Marine and Lonestar Marine - two of the major anchoring system suppliers in Oz recommended the swivel. 
BTW I wonder how often that author changes all his gal steel anchor terminal gear compared to the s/steel alternative to keep it serviceable- I think you’d agree it would be much more frequent than the s/s alternative (yes stainless has a service life and would have to be changed eventually as well). 

Anyway, as I said previously my s/s outboard mounting bolts, propeller, tilt trim shafts etc all spend far more time in saltwater than my anchor does - would that author recommend I change all these to gal steel !

In my original post above I have shared what I have used for the past 4years so that I do not need any tools to change the anchor. There was a concern raised about snap hook holding strength - which I have address. There was a concern about using s/s - largely raised on the basis of one author who has a different view to the rest of the industry. 
From what I can see, my anchoring requirements as a recreational powerboat user / fisherman are different from that of a cruising sail boater. 
We all have to evaluate pros and cons and then use what suits our needs best. I have shared what works for me.

电竞博彩app下载 cheers Zoran 

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While they might be a pain D & bow shackles are known to exceed their break rating by up to 5 times so extremely strong for their size.

电竞博彩app下载 I think I would be using 2 of them over those swivels on a heavy vessel even if they require more maintanace.

 

I have a couple of 4 tonne ones for 4x4 winch recovery's. 

 

电竞博彩app下载 Not sure how those carabiner clips do??

 

电竞博彩app下载 I think a lot of boaters are just a bit on the lazy side when it comes to those small things.

 

Edited by kingie chaser
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1 hour ago, zmk1962 said:

Thanks @kingfishbig. Another interesting read by the same author. He seems to be going against the rest of the industry on this topic. Both Stressfree Marine and Lonestar Marine - two of the major anchoring system suppliers in Oz recommended the swivel. 
BTW I wonder how often that author changes all his gal steel anchor terminal gear compared to the s/steel alternative to keep it serviceable- I think you’d agree it would be much more frequent than the s/s alternative (yes stainless has a service life and would have to be changed eventually as well). 

电竞博彩app下载 Anyway, as I said previously my s/s outboard mounting bolts, propeller, tilt trim shafts etc all spend far more time in saltwater than my anchor does - would that author recommend I change all these to gal steel !

In my original post above I have shared what I have used for the past 4years so that I do not need any tools to change the anchor. There was a concern raised about snap hook holding strength - which I have address. There was a concern about using s/s - largely raised on the basis of one author who has a different view to the rest of the industry. 
From what I can see, my anchoring requirements as a recreational powerboat user / fisherman are different from that of a cruising sail boater. 
We all have to evaluate pros and cons and then use what suits our needs best. I have shared what works for me.

cheers Zoran 

Well independent advice is valuable, ie manufacturers are not likely to malign their own product. There is another discussion here so he is not exactly a lone voice:

Yes you will have to replace gal chain and shackles every now and then but they are so cheap and easly to change over you can treat them as a disposable item. Obviously things like propellers, trim and tilt etc are not as easliy replaced and the forces are different (eg aluminium and even plastic are used for propellers and you wouldn't even think about using them for anchoring tackle).

电竞博彩app下载 The principles are the same whether you are anchoring a yacht or fishing boat as far as i can see. The former might spend more time anchored so the problems might show up more often - but that gives us something to learn from.

 

 

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I use marine grade stainless steel fasteners on my boat and trailer . Are they stronger than mild or high tensile steel? No they are not but I can use heavier gauge to get the same strength if I wish. I even use S/S D-shackles because they will outlast gal and they will not seize, I even use a snap hook on my reef anchor, the prongs will bend long before the 12 mm snap will, even the 14mm rope will break before the snap breaks.  How much load do you think you can put on the rope before the bow of a small tiny will go under? No where near enough to break a S/S D shackle, snap hook or quick link.  I hate rusting steel on my boat it stains everything. I don't use S/S chain due to cost but I replace the gal as soon as I see rust marks on it, not because it will break, it won't, rust marks on my clean gelcoat look crap.

My trailer has all 316 S/S bolts and U bolts, fastened with duralac,  these days you can't even find gal bolts or U bolts the so called zink plated start rusting the day after you dunk it in salt. I even use S/S brakes, calipers, rotors, brackets and backing plates on the pads. I started using S/S brakes in the early to mid 90's. Brakes always work never an issue but of course rotors are softer and will wear out quicker that steel but they stop when I want them too. I remember the bad old days of all steel rotors they would only last a couple years or so before pitting and then they rip the pads, constant maintenance.

I'm very happy using S/S as much as possible, less maintenance, much longer life and even cheaper over the long run.

电竞博彩app下载 Each to their own, what suits me may not suit others, I go on my many years of boating experience not what someone with self interest will try to sell me. 

 

 

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电竞博彩app下载 Make sure you lock S/S shackles as they are more prone to coming undone (see my link on shackles).

PS: Oversizing won't compensate for failure due to corrosion in S/S parts, that's what my links were about. It can result in almost zero strength and unexpected failures due to the lack of visual signs.  And your anchor is as safety item in the event of engine failure. 

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Oh dear. Here we go again. All the best @kingfishbig, with your concerns regarding s/s I seriously recommend you x-ray check your s/s outboard mounting bolts for internal corrosion very frequently, for your peace of mind. 
You can’t have one view on s/s shackles and another on all your other boat/motor s/s fittings.  
cheers Zoran 

ps - My last outboard s/s mounting bolts were in place for 21 years and spent far more time in water than my s/s anchor fittings - no corrosion issues. I am comfortable with my set up based on decades of personal experience. I’ll stick with what has worked for me. 

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2 hours ago, zmk1962 said:

Oh dear. Here we go again. All the best @kingfishbig, with your concerns regarding s/s I seriously recommend you x-ray check your s/s outboard mounting bolts for internal corrosion very frequently, for your peace of mind. 
You can’t have one view on s/s shackles and another on all your other boat/motor s/s fittings.  
cheers Zoran 

ps - My last outboard s/s mounting bolts were in place for 21 years and spent far more time in water than my s/s anchor fittings - no corrosion issues. I am comfortable with my set up based on decades of personal experience. I’ll stick with what has worked for me. 

Yes, well at least you have dropped comparisons to tilt rams and propellers. I'm not sure why you want to drag up different and unrelated applications when I have shown documented failures in S/S anchoring components, due to corrosion. Ie absolutely you can have different views for different applications.  

Edited by kingfishbig
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I just wanted to say, “Nice little innovation, Ron” @campr. You provoked a lot of discussion worthy of a metallurgists’ convention! 😂 Me? I can’t remember the last time I used an anchor... I just use Spot Lock on my Minn Kota if I want to sit in one spot. 🤷‍♂️ However, I might knock one of these tools up just in case.

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9 hours ago, kingfishbig said:

电竞博彩app下载 Make sure you lock S/S shackles as they are more prone to coming undone (see my link on shackles).

电竞博彩app下载 PS: Oversizing won't compensate for failure due to corrosion in S/S parts, that's what my links were about. It can result in almost zero strength and unexpected failures due to the lack of visual signs.  And your anchor is as safety item in the event of engine failure. 

Are you saying that marine grade S/S will corrode before mild or gal steel will?  Visual signs of corrosion? How hard is it to see the brown rust? 

You can use whatever you like on your boat, if you think mild steel is the go, your choice. If you need strength you should use high tensile fasteners. I know what to use on mine, I haven't had a marine grade S/S fastener fail due to corrosion in all my boating life, i don't think it happen now as I'm never going to use Chinese S/S, now I can guarantee that will rust in no time. Maybe that is what you are referring ?

I even use S/S acorn wheel nuts on my boat trailer in order to protect my wheel studs. I use to use chrome acorn nuts but I had to change them every few years due to rust.  Do you think they are going to fail due to corrosion or because they don't have the strength that mild steel has?

电竞博彩app下载 Shackles will come undone regardless if they are S/S, gal or mild steel if you don't check them to make sure they are tight.

Yes anchor is a safety item hence the reason you must have one on a boat, I have 2 and most fishos would have 2 as well.

Zoran , I don't think we are the only ones using marine grade S/S on our boats, every boat I have ever been on uses S/S fixtures and fittings. Some of the super luxury craft ($100 million plus) even use S/S anchors, I would too, only the cost stops me. I would use S/S chain as well if it wasn't  as pricey. I'm definitely not concerned it will break, the rope will break long before the chain. 

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电竞博彩app下载 I can assure you, regardless of what they are made out of, those snap clip things are as weak as a kitten, and I have personally tested those swivel gizmos, and they will have no place on my boat, the "bolt" holding it all together is only about 3-4mm.

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Here's an article about the use of swivels and how they are a weak link. Also they recommend against the use of any stainless steel components:

"One of our concerns is material. Stainless steel, in our view, is to be avoided for any load-bearing components in the anchor rode. (For more details regarding our aversion to stainless steel, see our special report,  PS February 2007 online)".

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On 8/21/2020 at 8:12 AM, kingfishbig said:

Make sure you lock S/S shackles as they are more prone to coming undone (see my link on shackles).

电竞博彩app下载 PS: Oversizing won't compensate for failure due to corrosion in S/S parts, that's what my links were about. It can result in almost zero strength and unexpected failures due to the lack of visual signs.  And your anchor is as safety item in the event of engine failure. 

Seems like the issue you raise would be a universal problem for all metals....why single out SS lol??. Plenty of gal fittings that can catastrophically fail due to hidden structural failures? And in fact one could argue that gal has a higher risk as the structural failure could be hidden under the gal coating undetected...a problem which does not exist in SS

Edited by GoingFishing
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